Listen, Think, Learn & Enjoy . . .

Observations

This is our first week back in the outdoor classroom. To ease back in and remind ourselves of the rules we had 5 activities. The children were to use their eyes, ears and nose to take notice These activities not only gave the children opportunities to ask questions and explore their curiosity, but gave them time to chat about their experiences during lockdown if they wanted to.

Activity 1. Take Notice: BIRDS:

Autumn is the time birds fly off to somewhere warm or will be getting ready to stay here for Winter.

Bird spotting is an activity the children have really mastered over time.

Why do you need to sit or stand quietly?

How many bird names can you remember?

Have we got any birds nesting in our grounds?

Activity 2. Take Notice: LEAVES:

leaves change through the seasons, they are the powerhouses for the trees to make energy to live and grow.

Can you explain why the leaves have a different appearance each season?

How many types of leaves did you find?

Which leaf is your favourite and why?

Activity 3. Take Notice: ANIMALS AND INSECTS:

Autumn is the time when animals and insects start to get ready for Winter. They will be looking for food and shelter in preparation for Winter.

Did you see any squirrel nests?

What is a squirrel nest called?

Were there any visible signs of animals?

What insects did you find?

Activity 4. Take Notice: SEEDS AND FRUIT:

Autumn is a great time for foraging. Some animals will be fattening up on fruit that is ready now. Seeds will get buried under falling leaves ready to grow in Spring.

What fruit did you find?

Did you check the seeds inside?

What differences did you notice between the different seeds?

What is the important rule when looking at berries?

Activity 5. Take Notice: FUNGI AND MUSHROOMS:

Lots of fungi will be fruiting around the leaf litter and on trees. Mushrooms and fungi live deep underground, the ones that we see are their flowers that help make more fungi.

How many fungi did you find?

Did any of the fungi have nibble or bite marks on them?

Can you explain why we never ever touch mushrooms and fungi?